Former chapel and homeless hostel that had a starring role on Challenge Anneka is back on the market

A former chapel and subject of a popular TV show has gone on the market in Telford.

The property is up for sale for over £1.6 million. Photo: Zoopla/Imperial Properties
The property is up for sale for over £1.6 million. Photo: Zoopla/Imperial Properties

An opportunity to pick up a piece of 1990s TV history has sprung up in Telford for £1.6m.

The Methodist chapel on Station Hill in Oakengates, Telford dates back to 1847.

The current property known as Wesley House - a rebuild - was built in 1868. In the early 1980s, it was taken over by the Telford Youth Training Agency.

The following decade, the property was converted by the Stay Homeless Project into a homeless youth hostel and became the subject of the television programme Challenge Anneka.

Anneka Rice helped convert the old chapel into a centre for the homeless over 30 years ago

For those too young to remember, the show involved presenter Anneka Rice being presented with a task to complete within a certain period - usually in aid of a charitable cause and usually within a couple of days.

Supposedly with no prior knowledge the task, she would have to organise its completion by persuading companies people to contribute their time and resources for free.

In the episode, Anneka was invited to the grand opening of the Oakengates hostel, only to find it unfinished.

Given 34 hours to complete the project, the young presenter was joined by a swathe of volunteers and tradespeople from around the town (including students from Wellington's Blessed Robert Johnson) to finish and furnish the project.

Anneka Rice helped convert the old chapel into a centre for the homeless over 30 years ago

The hostel provided temporary accommodation to young people with the provision of seven bedrooms and a shared communal space.

It ceased operating as a hostel in 2010 and had been left empty until planning permission was granted in 2017 for conversion into multiple apartments.

Now, the historic property has hit the market once again.

Made up of 12 apartments - two one-beds, nine two-beds and one three-beds - it features modern stained glass windows and private parking at the rear.

The property is currently pulling in a rental income of £83,220 each year, when fully let, it is expected it could bag a future landlord £100,620 a year.

Letting agents, Imperial Properties said the property would make "an excellent bolt on purchase for a residential investment company or seasoned investor".

More information is available online at zoopla.co.uk/for-sale/details/65497085

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