The Shropshire schools with no male teachers

Many primary schools across Shropshire do not have one male teacher - depriving growing boys of a positive role model. Many primary schools across Shropshire do not have one male teacher - depriving growing boys of a positive role model. Official government statistics reveal the staffrooms of 68 primary schools and nurseries in the region are populated solely by women. They show the classrooms of some 17 primaries and one nursery school in the Telford and Wrekin area have no male teachers. In the rest of the county, the children at a total of 51 primary schools are only taught by female staff. Nationally, 4,226 schools in England - 3,340 primaries and 386 nurseries - have no male staff, according to the latest data for 2009. This is despite a long-running government campaign to encourage men back into what is now seen as a female profession. Men also tend to shun working with younger children over fears they will be accused of paedophilia. It means many children have no regular contact with an adult man until they go to secondary school aged 11. But experts say it is vital for boys - particularly those who may not have a father at home - to have positive role models as they grow up.

The Shropshire schools with no male teachers

Many primary schools across Shropshire do not have one male teacher - depriving growing boys of a positive role model.

Official government statistics reveal the staffrooms of 68 primary schools and nurseries in the region are populated solely by women.

They show the classrooms of some 17 primaries and one nursery school in the Telford and Wrekin area have no male teachers.

In the rest of the county, the children at a total of 51 primary schools are only taught by female staff.

Nationally, 4,226 schools in England - 3,340 primaries and 386 nurseries - have no male staff, according to the latest data for 2009.

This is despite a long-running government campaign to encourage men back into what is now seen as a female profession.

Men also tend to shun working with younger children over fears they will be accused of paedophilia.

It means many children have no regular contact with an adult man until they go to secondary school aged 11.

But experts say it is vital for boys - particularly those who may not have a father at home - to have positive role models as they grow up.

According to the Government's Trading and Development Agency, the number of applications from men to train to become primary school teachers has risen by 20 per cent over the last five years, while initial enquiries from men about entering the profession have risen by 45 per cent in the last year.

However, it remains the case that men still only account for 15 per cent of registered teaching staff in primary schools, according to figures from the General Teaching Council.

The TDA is awaiting its new remit from the coalition Government.

By London Reporter Sunita Patel

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