Parents say children have missed out on life during pandemic

After two years of home schooling and interrupted learning, nearly seven in ten parents across the country are worried that the pandemic has impacted their child’s development.

SHREWS COPYRIGHT SHROPSHIRE STAR JAMIE RICKETTS 04/04/2018 - The Childhood Tumour Trust has organised a camp for children at PGL Boreatton Park in Baschurch. Children from across the UK and also USA. The camps emable children to believe in themselves, gain confidence and self-esteem, make life-long friends and experience independence by staying away from home on their own, and for the older ones, by travelling and meeting new people half-way around the world...In Picture:Anna Day 16 from Orpington on a Zip Wire..
SHREWS COPYRIGHT SHROPSHIRE STAR JAMIE RICKETTS 04/04/2018 - The Childhood Tumour Trust has organised a camp for children at PGL Boreatton Park in Baschurch. Children from across the UK and also USA. The camps emable children to believe in themselves, gain confidence and self-esteem, make life-long friends and experience independence by staying away from home on their own, and for the older ones, by travelling and meeting new people half-way around the world...In Picture:Anna Day 16 from Orpington on a Zip Wire..

The research comes from PGL, provider of adventure trips for schools, which had a base at Boreatton near Baschurch.

It found parents are concerned about multiple aspects including emotional, social and academic.

Nearly half are anxious about their child’s emotional development, expressing concerns that their child has difficulties communicating their feelings, expressing anger or other emotions, and dealing with things they don’t like. An additional 43 per cent have worries about social development, fretting about their child’s lack of confidence or difficulties interacting and communicating with others.

In response PGL, which is famous for its rite-of-passage year six school trips offering children the chance to grow in a safe and secure environment, has created a new outdoor adventure programme called Pioneers. This has been specially designed for Year 4 pupils to provide a gentle start to their first trip away, to help them get back on track and experience independent learning and development.

Psychologist and child development expert Honey Langcaster-James, who is working with PGL on the study said: “Our formative years play an important role in shaping who we become when we’re grown ups, so I’m not surprised to see so many parents concerned about their children’s development.

"After the past couple of years, many parents will instinctively want to help their children catch up on their social skills and experiences. Giving them a sense of their own independence on a residential trip such as those offered by PGL is a great way to give them those opportunities in a safe and secure environment. At around the age of eight years old, most children are starting to learn about who they are as individuals, so giving them time away from their parents to have fun and grow in confidence can do wonders for their future development.”

Anthony Jones, chief executive officer for PGL said: “The past two years took its toll on all of us, none more so than young children who had to adapt to a new way of learning and a new way of living. At PGL, it’s our goal to help get kids back on track after the pandemic, which is why we are so happy to offer Year 4 children a residential trip which has been specially designed to support their needs and gently introduce them to their first trip away from home.

"Pupils will experience an action-packed programme of amazing adventure activities and fun challenges, designed to help build resilience and start them on their path towards independence.”

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