WATCH: It'll be Christmas in Shropshire as vaccinated Martin, 91, tells CNN ‘no point in dying now’

A pensioner who was among the first in the world to receive the Covid vaccine, and became a global media star for his TV interview, says he is looking forward to coming to Shropshire to see his family for Christmas.

Martin Kenyon speaking to CNN’s Cyril Vanier about his experience in receiving the vaccine at Guy’s Hospital in London
Martin Kenyon speaking to CNN’s Cyril Vanier about his experience in receiving the vaccine at Guy’s Hospital in London

Martin Kenyon, 91, spoke to CNN’s Cyril Vanier about his experience in receiving the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine at Guy’s Hospital in London.

The interview has gone viral since been viewed more than five million times on Twitter, as Mr Kenyon – who said he phoned ahead to see if he was eligible – charmed his interviewer as well as audiences online.

Speaking to CNN, the grandfather-of-two said: "They duly put me on the list, I went off and had a rather nasty lunch, and then came back and they were ready for me.

“It didn’t hurt at all. I didn’t know the needle had gone in until it had come out. Painless.

“Of course, I couldn’t damn well find anywhere to park my car so I was late."

He added: “I don’t think I feel about it at all, except that I hope I’m not going to have the bloody bug now.

“Well, there’s no point in dying now when I’ve lived this long, is there?”

More Covid-19 coverage:

Mr Kenyon appeared on Good Morning Britain today after his CNN interview went worldwide, prompting laughter when he asked Piers Morgan: “Now, who are you?”

Speaking to the hosts about his family, he said: "I'm very much looking forward to us all being together for Christmas in Shropshire.

"I'm a Shropshire lad and I have a lovely view of the Welsh mountains from where I am there – one of the finest views in Western Europe."

He added that people should not be reluctant to get the vaccine.

Mr Kenyon, who was also involved with Desmond Tutu at the very start of the global campaign to get rid of apartheid in South Africa, added: "It would be foolish of them to be reluctant about it if it means the chance of them behaving normally instead of being worried they might get the horrible bug."

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