Court overturns decision on Shropshire farm wind turbine

Controversial plans to build a 24-metre wind turbine in the Shropshire countryside have been put on hold after a High Court judge intervened.

Gavin Lloyd was given planning permission by a Government inspector to put up the turbine to provide energy at his home and farm at the Old Hall Barn in Kenley, near Shrewsbury, after the proposals were turned down by Shropshire Council.

The turbine is also intended to power holiday let accommodation at the property. But yesterday the decision was quashed following a High Court challenge by local residents.

They claimed the inspector had been wrong in his view that the turbine would not have a ‘significant adverse impact on recognised environmental assets’ in the local area.

The application will now have to be reconsidered by another inspector.

Mr Justice Kenneth Parker said he agreed with residents’ concerns that the inspector had failed to correctly apply the provisions of Shropshire Council’s development plan for the area.

He found that the inspector “had no basis” for stating that the development complied with planning policies “when, on the basis of his own findings, it plainly did not, because it would cause significant adverse environmental effects”.

Mr Justice Parker said it was up to the inspector to balance the non-compliance with the benefits of renewable energy production and added that if the inspector had done so, it would have been ‘plain to all how precisely he had reached his final determination’. He added: “I would conclude that the error was a material one that undermined the validity of the inspector’s reasoning and that the decision should accordingly be quashed.”

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Comments for: "Court overturns decision on Shropshire farm wind turbine"

Poddle

This is getting daft - just where do you expect to get power from - we might have fracking here - which would you rather have a fracking plant or a turbine???????

NIMBYS

Ian G

Typical reaction from one of the greenwashed zealots who are blind to the greed of developers and operators of wind farms. Poddle....you fail to mention the huge subsidies that we are all paying to idiots like these whose only impact will be to despoil the landscape? I don't see Shropshire saving the planet by having loads more wind turbines - or is it just another pathetic ineffective and purely symbolic act to combat climate change? And why stop at fracking if you are trying to sensationalise alternatives to 'renewables'? Why not raise the spectre of nuclear as well...

Idiot !

Mike cross

These industrial scale turbines in ones, twos and even threes are claimed to provide power for a farm or smallbusiness. Many Turbine 'owning' landowners leave the land and live elswhere where there are no Turbines. They are in fact cash cows subsidised by all tax payers which will, because of subsidies make a lot of money for very few. The health & wellbeing and property values of all in the area are sacrificed. The turbines have a short life are not reliable and need back up. A fracking plant will provide natural gas for 100,000s of homes economically to be burnt safely and efficiently (over 90% is easy with the latest boilers) and on demand. We are heading into a global cooling period or even a little ice age and many in fuel poverty NOW will not survive such a severe climate. Only many nuclear stations and abundant gas for domestic heating will enable us to maintain our standard of living.

CommonSence

We dont need wind Turbines blighting the countryside, this is another get rich quick plight by farmers.

There is a very simple answer to generating power with a 24/7 solution. Dredge the rivers and install water turbines, this will also stop all the flooding, farmers need to clean ditches out, also bring back the road-men to maintain drains and gullies.

Problem solved.

Robin

Well, firstly, you would need to have people drilling for oil or gas before fracking was even a consideration, and secondly, what do you mean by "fracking plant"? Fracking is a very quick operation that is completed in a few hours after the well has been completed. Once that is complete the fracking equipment is moved off-site - usually on trucks.

james

a fracking plant any day besides we will need the gas to power the backup generators for the 95% of the time the wind turbines don't work.

john davies

Well not from wind that’s for sure.

Last year- 2011 UKs entire 4,136 wind turbine fleet wind generated only 15,498 GWh, that’s just 4.14 % of total annual electrical demand, at a cost of £ billions that’s been added to our bills & given as subsidies to (mainly foreign) developers.

We should be spending that cash on energy conservation, not on ways of producing more energy.

Wind is unpredictable & unreliable, on land windfarms are even less effective than offshore

Look at the red line on the graphs in column 3 to see how volatile wind is –

http://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk/

Try our beta site!

We’re getting ready to launch our brand new website for shropshirestar.com and we’d like to give you a sneak preview.

We’re still applying the finishing touches, so please bear with us if something’s not quite right.

We'd love to hear your thoughts, good or bad, via the simple feedback button that you'll see to the right side of every page.

Try the beta