Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby inspire spoof art prize winner

The annual Turnip Prize goes to someone who has ‘created something that they perceive to be crap art using the least amount of effort possible’.

Turnip Prize
Turnip Prize

A spoof art prize has been won by an entry inspired by claims that Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby jumped the queue to see the Queen lying in state.

The annual Turnip Prize goes to someone who has “created something that they perceive to be crap art using the least amount of effort possible”.

This year’s winner was a creation by an artist known only as Lie Instate, entitled Cue Jumpers, which was created from a pool cue and two small jumpers.

The winning artist, known only as Lie Instate, with his masterpiece and the Turnip Prize (Trevor Prideaux/PA)
The winning artist, known only as Lie Instate (Trevor Prideaux/PA)

The 38-year-old cinema projectionist, from Tooting, south London, was motivated by the backlash surrounding Schofield and Willoughby attending the lying in state at Westminster Hall to film a segment for their ITV morning show without joining the public queue.

The TV stars later acknowledged the backlash but stressed they had “respected” the rules set for the media.

“It was while visiting Gordon the Gopher in rehab that I first had the idea of bringing Phillip Schofield down through the power of art,” the artist said.

“Gordon kindly lent me two of his jumpers for the piece and at that point I knew it was in the can.

A torn second class stamp paying homage to the death of The Queen is among the entries in the spoof Turnip Prize (Trevor Prideaux/PA)
A torn second-class stamp paying homage to the death of the Queen was among the entries (Trevor Prideaux/PA)

“It’s a great honour and I am reeling with delight to win this prestigious award.”

Other shortlisted entries included pieces inspired by the death of the Queen, Government bureaucracy and the war in Ukraine.

The award was made in front of a packed audience at The New Inn in Wedmore, Somerset.

Prize organiser Trevor Prideaux, the pub’s landlord, said: “I am delighted with the lack of effort taken to create this work.

“This year’s event attracted 69 entries, it’s fantastic that Lie Instate has won.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine is recognised by an a yellow crane carrying a yew sprig (Trevor Prideaux/PA)
The Russian invasion of Ukraine is recognised by a yellow crane carrying a yew sprig (Trevor Prideaux/PA)

“He clearly has what it takes to be recognised in modern art circles and will be remembered in art history for no time at all.

“I believe that over the last 24 years the artists entering the Turnip Prize have created by far better works than Alex Farquharson and the Tate Britain gallery could ever wish to exhibit.”

The competition pokes fun at modern art’s most important award, the Turner Prize.

It began in 1999 as a response to Tracey Emin’s unmade bed, which was exhibited at the Tate gallery that year.

Winners of the competition receive a turnip attached to a wooden base.

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