The smallest cars you can buy in 2021

Looking for something tiny to drive around in? Here are your best bets.

Honda e
Honda e

In the modern world, everyone’s looking to buy big. Even in the hatchback and supermini market, manufacturers have been building SUV-like versions of their cars because buyers want to feel like they’re getting more bang for their buck.

However, with many people living and therefore driving in cities, sometimes all you want is something tiny to get you from A to B with the minimum of fuss.

If that sounds like you, here are some of the best of the smallest cars on sale today.

Fiat 500

Fiat 500
(Fiat)

The Fiat 500 is one of the biggest success stories of the modern car industry, proving hugely popular thanks to its cute, retro styling and diminutive stature. A new model is out now, giving the styling a more futuristic edge but with the same retro charm that’s proved a hit with buyers.

It’s electric-only now, too – though you can still buy the old model with a petrol engine – and comes with hard-top and cabriolet versions.

Hyundai i10

Hyundai i10
(Hyundai)

The Hyundai i10 was fairly recently updated with a stylish new look and a decent interior while also being great to drive. It’s also surprisingly practical, so although it doesn’t have the boot space of larger family cars, it does mean jumping in something small doesn’t mean you have to forgo space.

One thing to note, though, is that the entry-level models really are basic, so if you want a few creature comforts be sure to step up a few levels.

Toyota Aygo

Toyota Aygo
(Toyota)

Toyota has built its reputation on building bulletproof, affordable cars, and with the Aygo it’s a fantastic example of this. This little city car looks really funky and while it’s not the most interesting or good-looking cabin, its simplicity is one of its key selling points.

This doesn’t mean it’s boring, though, because while it’s not the most exciting on the inside (as hard as the odd splash of colour tries) it’s actually great fun to drive.

Renault Zoe

Renault Zoe
(Renault)

There are a few electric vehicles on this list, because city cars and EVs are a great mix. The Renault Zoe was one of the first and the French firm has used its time ahead of the game to also become one of the best.

It has simple, chic looks, a pleasant cabin and a hugely impressive range of almost 250 miles, meaning that even though it’s meant for urban life, it could feasibly be used on longer trips too.

Honda e

Honda e
(Honda)

On the flip side is the Honda e. This is another electric city car but one that’s firmly designed for city life, having a range of about 135 miles.

While that might limit its appeal somewhat, it more than makes up for it in the looks department. The Honda e looks like nothing else on the road, while inside it has a unique interior that features wide open spaces and full-width monitors. It’s ultra-futuristic.

Volkswagen Up

VW Up
(VW)

It’s a bit predictable, but if you’re looking for a simple, robust car then Volkswagen is one of the first places you should look. The German car giant has its own tiny car, called Up! And if you can get past the fact your car’s name has an exclamation mark in it, it’s a great buy.

It’s also useful because you have the choice of the standard petrol engines, or the electric e-Up – and with a range of up to 161 miles it’s not bad for such a small car.

Smart EQ Fortwo

Smart EQ Fortwo
(Smart)

If you’re considering a small car, Smart has long been the go-to brand, building genuinely desirable cars that are so tiny you could park them sideways in a parking space. The new generation has been reborn as an EV – there’s a theme to this list, isn’t there – which looks fantastic while keeping the same brilliant driving characteristics of its predecessor.

It’s quite pricey, though – starting from around £22,000 it’s a similar price to the e-Up! above but being smaller with a lower range of less than 100 miles. Therefore, you really have to buy into its teeny tiny ethos to justify the cost.

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