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Farming Talk – December 6

Farming | Published:

Rural businesses with let residential property are reminded that the energy efficiency standards they are expected to meet will tighten in the coming months.

Luke Clay, graduate surveyor, Strutt & Parker

From April 1, the rules which require let homes to have an Energy Performance Certificate rating of E or above will apply to existing residential tenancies, as well as new lettings.

Philipa Bateman, a graduate surveyor at Strutt & Parker, says this means that from April a landlord must not continue letting any domestic property, subject to a number of exemptions, if it has an EPC rating of F or G.

She explains: “It is important to note that exemptions are also tightening up. Any exemptions previously granted under the 'no cost to the landlord' rule, registered between October 1, 2017, and March 31, 2019, also come to an end on March 31 next year.

“In instances where a landlord is unable to improve their property to E within a £3,500 cap, then they will need to install all measures which can be installed up to the £3,500 cap, and then register a new exemption on the basis that all relevant improvements have been installed and the property remains below E.”

MEES regulations are designed to establish minimum efficiency standards across privately-rented homes.

Luke Clay, graduate surveyor, Strutt & Parker

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