Shropshire from the sky: New perspective given by pictures snapped by drone

Aerial photography used to involve finding a volunteer to hang precariously from a helicopter.

Lord Hill’s column stands proud in a new drone image captured by Star chief photographer Tim Thursfield
Lord Hill’s column stands proud in a new drone image captured by Star chief photographer Tim Thursfield

The arrival of drones has changed all that. It has allowed news organisations to literally get an instant new perspective.

And, as long as you are trained and licensed, it also enables anyone to experiment with images from several hundred feet up.

Severn Park, Bridgnorth, and the rugby club, were flooded in January
Shirehall and Lord Hill's Column, Shrewsbury
The Iron Bridge in Ironbridge. Photo: Ian Harvey.

Today we feature some images of landmarks taken by drone. Many have been taken by our chief photographer Tim Thursfield and some have been submitted by readers over the year.

Tim, 50, has many years experience and has hopped on board a helicopter several times to take newspaper images.

Telford & Wrekin Council aerial photo showing flooding on River Severn in Ironbridge in March 2019
Work on the link road off Mile End Roundabout, Oswestry
Buttington Quarry, Welshpool

He said: “The drone has given us the option of getting a bird's-eye view on big events, landmarks or new buildings. You can also be creative. Looking directly down to the ground can provide an image that makes you look twice.

“The new technology has transformed photography just as it has film-making. And it is great fun to experiment with new techniques.”

A rapeseed field near to Knockin Heath
The mini roundabout next to Shrewsbury Club, Sundorne Road, Shrewsbury
Housing developments off Oteley Road, Shrewsbury
The old station building in Brownlow Road, Ellesmere, which is due to be developed for housing
The Wrekin. Photo: Wayne Gaskell
Fire crews tackling a blaze on the Wrekin. Photo: Sam Bagnall

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