Shropshire's forced adoption figures are revealed

Nearly 100 children have been forcibly taken away from their parents in Shropshire in the last four years, new figures today revealed.

Shropshire's forced adoption figures are revealed

Nearly 100 children have been forcibly taken away from their parents in Shropshire in the last four years, new figures today revealed.

The release of the information comes following a Freedom of Information request published on www.whatdotheyknow.com The figures, revealed by Shropshire Council, show that between April 1, 2006, and March 31 this year, 95 children were forcibly removed.

Forcible adoption or "placement orders" are orders authorising a local authority to place a child for adoption where there is no parental consent, or where consent is not required.

The consent of a parent or guardian may not be necessary in certain circumstances, such as if the parent or guardian cannot be found or they are incapable of giving their agreement, for example through mental illness. Consent may also not be required if a court is satisfied that the welfare of the child is in danger.

Only local authorities can apply for a placement order, which they must do if a child is the subject of a care order and there is no parental consent, or where they consider the child is at risk of harm.

Adoption

Heather Jones, assistant information governance officer for Shropshire Council, said: "The adoption service for Shropshire is a joint service for Telford & Wrekin Council and Shropshire Council.

"The number of children forcibly adopted by this service from April 1, 2006, to March 31, this year is 95."

Shropshire Council officers said they could not provide a breakdown of figures per year.

Catherine Warner, head of Joint Adoption Service at Shropshire Council, said: "Forceable adoption takes place when a court has determined that a child can no longer live with their birth family for a variety of reasons."

The news comes as fears were voiced by a Shirehall union leader that Shropshire is "very, very lucky" it has not had its own Baby P case because of growing workload pressure on council staff and funding cuts.

Last week Lou Gladden, assistant branch secretary of Shropshire Unison, claimed services were already at "breaking point". Baby P - Peter Connelly - died in London in 2007 after suffering horrific abuse.

By Emma Kasprzak

Sorry, we are not accepting comments on this article.

Top Stories

More from the Shropshire Star

UK & International News